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How fathers might get full custody after divorce

When fathers in Texas get a divorce, they may feel that the courts tend to favor the mother for child custody. Furthermore, fathers often must fight against stereotypes such as the deadbeat dad. If a father truly wants to get primary custody, however, there are several things he can do to increase the likelihood that this will happen.

Children can benefit from shared parenting

For Texas parents who are going through a divorce, there are a number of common ideas about child custody and shared parenting that can actually undermine efforts to develop a positive plan. Indeed, decisions about custody and parenting time are generally made according to a standard of the best interests of the child, which correctly prioritizes the most important issues but can be interpreted differently by judges, lawyers and parents.

Social trends favor shared parenting approach to child custody

When Texas parents of young children decide to divorce, the issue of child custody will naturally be foremost in their minds. Some of them might have grown up with little contact with their fathers if their parents divorced because courts frequently showed bias toward giving mothers custody in previous generations. The philosophy of shared parenting or co-parenting has begun to replace old fashioned notions about child rearing. Some parents know from the beginning that they want joint custody, and activists and lawmakers in more than 20 states are seeking legal reforms to child custody standards.

Holidays during divorce

Divorce and separation are always painful for families in Texas, and things can get even tougher around the winter holidays. In many cases, this is the first time that the spouses will not be spending this time together. Change of this type often raises questions as to where the children will be during the festivities.

Divorce doesn't have to mean separation from children

When heading into a divorce, a Texas father's greatest fear may be losing his connection with his children. Going from being part of one's children's daily lives to seeing them only part-time can be emotionally difficult as well as logistically draining. In fact, concerns about access to children can keep many parents in relationships long after they would have chosen a divorce otherwise. However, there are mechanisms to help to ensure that the parent-child relationship remains fully intact despite a marital split.

Co-parenting can be a difficult yet achievable task

Co-parenting after a divorce can be a difficult process for Texas estranged couples. Because people can have a variety of emotional reactions to their ex-partner, these can be easily reflected in the parenting relationship as well. Sometimes those difficulties can be as simple as pain over the past marital problems, but sometimes they can reflect serious concerns about abuse, irresponsibility, alienation of the children or addiction.

Changing perceptions of fatherhood

Some Texas fathers may be among the 52 percent who say they struggle in balancing their family life with their work life. In 2015, Pew Research Center conducted a survey that looked at fathers' attitudes about being a parent and found that while there are fewer fathers who are also the sole breadwinners compared to previous generations, fathers spend more time with their children. In 1970, in nearly half of couples with children, fathers were the main breadwinners. By 2015, that percentage had dropped to just over one-quarter. In 2015, fathers also spent almost three times as much time caring for their children weekly compared to 1965.

Fathers still often not awarded primary custody

Although there have been major advances in gender equality, men in Texas and elsewhere are still not generally being awarded physical custody of their children following a divorce. In fact, the mothers are being awarded physical custody approximately 80 percent of the time.

Nesting as a form of physical custody

When going through a divorce, it is especially important for Texas parents to be mindful of how ending their marriage can impact their children. While changes will occur, there are many ways parents can make the process easier. One option they could consider is a nesting arrangement.

When a parent wants to block virtual visitation

Texas parents who are dealing with custody and visitation after a divorce might want to find out about virtual visitation. Virtual visitation refers to communication between a non-custodial parent and a child through texting, calling or video-conferencing. In fact, as the technology is available, courts have begun to award virtual visitation to parents that live too far away for physical contact.