Property Division Matters

While few people entering marriage imagine that their new marriage may end in separation or divorce, many engaged individuals have good reasons to create a prenuptial agreement. If you are an older individual who has accumulated significant assets, are marrying for the second or third time, or have children from a previous marriage or relationship, a prenup can help prevent misunderstandings or unintended losses in the event of a marital separation.

To schedule a consultation with a Grapevine community property lawyer, contact Teller Law Firm.

A prenuptial agreement can be particularly important when a marital separation takes place in a community property state such as Texas. Marital assets which may be considered the community property of both spouses in Texas include the following:

  • Real estate
  • Pension plans
  • Retirement funds
  • Stock options
  • Personal property

To ensure that a prenuptial agreement is as ironclad as possible, at Teller Law Firm, we counsel clients through a three-step process:

  • Full disclosure of property to each other in advance of the prenup (or a waiving of the right to disclosure)
  • Thoughtful preparation of a prenuptial agreement that will accomplish a client's goals
  • Post-marital ratification of the prenuptial agreement.

Completion of all three steps makes it clear that neither spouse was coerced into agreeing to the prenuptial contract and agrees with the terms.

Teller Law Firm welcomes the opportunity to explain how a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement can fit your needs. Our attorneys will help you and your new spouse understand how Texas' community property laws apply to your situation. Contact us today to schedule a consultation by phone or email.