Divorce trends may change with age

| Feb 13, 2019 | Divorce |

People in Texas may decide to divorce at different times and stages in life. Across the American population, however, people are more likely to have some experiences at certain times in their lives. One report examined census information to look at the outcomes of people’s marriages based on their age.

For example, in 2017, around half of 30-year-old Americans had never been married. While around 40 percent were in their first marriage, another 10 percent were separated, divorced or on their second or later marriage. By the age of 63, around 41.5 percent of the participants were either separated, divorced or remarried. Trends in divorce have changed over the years, and the 2017 results were compared to 1980 and 1960 results. In 1960 and 1980, a higher number of people were divorced, separated or remarried by 30.

A far greater number of people 50 and up were likely to be divorced or separated in 2017 than in previous years; this comes as no surprise given that the young people of the 1980 survey would be older participants in the 2017 results. Still, many have pointed to the growth in “gray divorce,” which is when people choose to divorce after the age of 50. In many cases, these people are in their second or later marriages, but an increasing number of older people have chosen to end even first marriages later in life.

“Gray divorce” can present its own challenges, especially as both parties will have far less time to prepare for retirement after the financial effects of divorce. However, the financial impact of divorce can be considerable at any time of life. A family law attorney may work with a divorcing spouse to help them understand the potential outcomes and negotiate a fair settlement on a range of divorce legal matters, including property division and spousal support.