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Divorce Archives

Correlation found between some jobs, divorce rate

Texas bartenders, flight attendants and casino workers may be more likely to get a divorce than people in professions such as actuary or physician. A survey presented by FlowingData drawing on data from the 2015 American Community Survey found that while actuaries had a divorce rate lower than 20 percent and that of physicians was just above 20 percent, the divorce rate for bartenders and gaming managers was higher than 50 percent. Overall, occupations that focused on science and math tended to have considerably lower divorce rates than the 2015 average of 35 percent while those in jobs that dealt with transportation or night life had higher ones.

Social Security benefits after divorce

Many Texas divorces affect the Social Security benefits of one or both parties. Social Security tends to be an asset that is not as often thought about as more tangible benefits like real property or investments. Even so, understanding the impact a divorce has on Social Security is a vital part of post-divorce financial planning, especially for those over the age of 62.

Millennials and prenuptial agreements

Millennials in Texas and other parts of the country are moving on with their lives, getting jobs, getting married, and having kids. Like all couples who get married, they hope that their union will last a lifetime. However, many are also realistic and are more inclined than their grandparents and parents to have a prenuptial agreement.

Realistic divorce expectations

Divorce is a frightening prospect for many Texas couples. In addition to the challenging and painful emotions that emerge, many who face divorce are also facing an uncertain future. It can be helpful to have a good understanding of what divorce is meant to accomplish and keep reasonable expectations of what will happen.

Misconceptions can lead to poor decisions in divorce cases

Texas couples who are ending their marriages often need to make a number of important decisions, and making a poor choice can sometimes cast a long shadow. Spouses in need of direction often turn to close friends or family members or acquaintances who have been through a divorce themselves, but the advice they are given is often based on poor information, misunderstandings or misconceptions.

Making a child support agreement outside of court

Texas parents who are ending their marriage and who have one or more minor children might want to consider negotiating a child support agreement instead of going to court to have a judge make the determination. They may do this in informal negotiations by themselves. Another option is for their respective attorneys to take the lead.

Coping strategies for children to deal with divorce

Good communication can be an important tool for Texas parents who want to help their children adjust to a divorce. Parents should try to talk to children about the divorce early on because children will notice signs such as parents sleeping in separate bedrooms or one parent moving out. They need reassurance that the divorce is not their fault and that their parents will still take care of them. Their questions should be answered, and if children do not ask questions, parents should regularly check in with them and keep the lines of communication open.

Husbands who work are less likely to get divorced

Changes in attitudes toward marriage since the 1970s have made it easier for women in Texas and elsewhere to split from their husbands. Economic independence has also made it easier for women to leave a marriage that does not meet their needs. However, a study from a Harvard professor published in American Sociological Review suggests that the success or failure of a marriage may hinge on whether a husband is employed.