${site.data.firmName}${SEMFirmNameAlt}
Toll Free: 800-470-8194
Local: 817-612-4298
Practice Areas

August 2017 Archives

Co-parenting can be a difficult yet achievable task

Co-parenting after a divorce can be a difficult process for Texas estranged couples. Because people can have a variety of emotional reactions to their ex-partner, these can be easily reflected in the parenting relationship as well. Sometimes those difficulties can be as simple as pain over the past marital problems, but sometimes they can reflect serious concerns about abuse, irresponsibility, alienation of the children or addiction.

Millennials and prenuptial agreements

Millennials in Texas and other parts of the country are moving on with their lives, getting jobs, getting married, and having kids. Like all couples who get married, they hope that their union will last a lifetime. However, many are also realistic and are more inclined than their grandparents and parents to have a prenuptial agreement.

Positive aspects of a prenuptial agreement

Texas residents who are planning on getting married might wonder whether they need a prenuptial agreement. There are a number of reasons that one person might want a prenup including to protect children from a previous marriage or to shield an existing business. While a prenup might seem as though it is contrary to the ideas of a wedding, it can actually be an opportunity for couples to discuss and clarify their attitudes about money, spending and saving.

How to be an effective parent after a divorce

While a stable marriage may be ideal for Texas families, it is not always possible for parents to stay together. In some cases, parents may not even get married before they decide to go their separate ways. If parents do decide to get divorced or end their relationship, it is important to engage in effective co-parenting to preserve the best interest of their children.