As you begin the divorce process, you might immediately wonder how your children will handle the news and the changes to come.

Rather than letting stress build up, there are ways you can work together with your ex to make sure your children are comfortable through the transition. You can vow to not let your divorce impact either parent’s relationship with their children. And finding peace with how your marriage ended instead of saying negative things about one another may also help your kids.

Be present for children

Continuing to be involved in your child’s life after the divorce is important. If you’ll share custody, think of ways you can let your child connect with their other parent during your parenting time. This may include letting your child call or contact their other parent. And if your child is involved in sports or other activities, you can allow each other to attend these child-centered events, no matter whose turn it is with the kids. While you might not always look forward to crossing paths with your ex, these efforts may help your children feel that your love for them is unchanging even though family dynamics are different.

Have a filter in front of kids

You shouldn’t blame your co-parent for the divorce or say negative things about them to your child. Divorce isn’t easy. But reaching out to fellow adults or seeking therapy may be healthier for both you and your children. In fact, there’s research that demonstrates that children not only recognize a parent’s negatives emotions, but can wind up experiencing the same emotions too. There’s a chance that the stress or anxiety you foster or pass along can affect a child’s emotional and physical health. So instead of picking a new battle each time you see your ex, you should think about how continuous fighting may impact your child.

Being a steady part of your child’s life is important, but so is having a filter when you choose to speak to them. Parenting plan drafting or preparing for court with a family law attorney can help you build accountability within your co-parent relationship.

How co-parents can collaborate for the sake of their children

As you begin the divorce process, you might immediately wonder how your children will handle the news and the changes to come.

Rather than letting stress build up, there are ways you can work together with your ex to make sure your children are comfortable through the transition. You can vow to not let your divorce impact either parent’s relationship with their children. And finding peace with how your marriage ended instead of saying negative things about one another may also help your kids.

Be present for children

Continuing to be involved in your child’s life after the divorce is important. If you’ll share custody, think of ways you can let your child connect with their other parent during your parenting time. This may include letting your child call or contact their other parent. And if your child is involved in sports or other activities, you can allow each other to attend these child-centered events, no matter whose turn it is with the kids. While you might not always look forward to crossing paths with your ex, these efforts may help your children feel that your love for them is unchanging even though family dynamics are different.

Have a filter in front of kids

You shouldn’t blame your co-parent for the divorce or say negative things about them to your child. Divorce isn’t easy. But reaching out to fellow adults or seeking therapy may be healthier for both you and your children. In fact, there’s research that demonstrates that children not only recognize a parent’s negatives emotions, but can wind up experiencing the same emotions too. There’s a chance that the stress or anxiety you foster or pass along can affect a child’s emotional and physical health. So instead of picking a new battle each time you see your ex, you should think about how continuous fighting may impact your child.

Being a steady part of your child’s life is important, but so is having a filter when you choose to speak to them. Parenting plan drafting or preparing for court with a family law attorney can help you build accountability within your co-parent relationship.